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Linux Can Change the Face of Automated Library Information Systems

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/483

Linux Can Change the Face of Automated Library Information Systems

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Title: Linux Can Change the Face of Automated Library Information Systems
Author: Teal, Janis; Gaillard, Greg
Subject(s): Linux
Library Information Systems
LIS
OPAC
Abstract: MLA Abstract 2005 (Case Report) Title: Linux Can Change the Face of Automated Library Information Systems Authors/Affiliation: Janis Teal, AHIP, Deputy Director for Library Services, The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center; Greg Gaillard, Deputy Director for Technology Support, The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center Objective: This poster will report on how the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center (UNM HSLIC) faced the dilemma of replacing an antiquated library information systems (LIS) server in a cost-effective manner that would make use of $10,000 available funding, improve system functionality and performance, and decrease overall system costs. Setting: HSLIC is a medium-sized academic health sciences library running Innovative Interfaces, Inc. (III) LIS software. In 2003 the LIS (with 180,000 catalog records) was running on a 7-year old DEC Unix system with unsupported hardware, a CPU with inadequate response time, and full disk drives. Method: Recognizing the need to upgrade the system, the Deputy Directors analyzed several options: 1) combining systems with the main campus libraries; 2) purchasing a new Compaq Alpha server at $20,000; or 3) implementing a Linux-based LIS running on Intel ‘commodity’ hardware. We selected option 3 and, at the conclusion of the project, became the first library in the United States to implement III LIS software on a Linux server. HSLIC employees in both library services and technology support consulted with III staff throughout the process of configuring the server, updating the III software, and migrating records. Main Results: 1) The project successfully upgraded hardware, the operating system, and application software to current III standards. 2) There was a significant increase in performance and functionality. 3) This implementation was accomplished at 1/3 the cost of using a non-Intel server platform. 4) The Linux-based Intel system represents significantly decreased hardware capital and maintenance costs. 5) There is no longer a need for the library to have in-house DEC Unix expertise, an intangible but significant cost savings. 6) Additional intangible cost savings are expected in the future when, in contrast to standard server hardware, the new hardware running Linux can be repurposed after the current system is upgraded. Conclusion: A small to mid-sized library can effectively run a Linux/Intel LIS system at demonstrably lower cost than doing so on proprietary RISC*-based software/hardware. *Reduced Instruction Set Computing
Date: 2005-10-17
Description: Poster Presented at Medical Library Association Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, May, 2005
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/483

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