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dc.contributor.authorRinehart, Jenny Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-28T17:13:27Z
dc.date.available2012-08-28T17:13:27Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-28
dc.date.submittedJuly 2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1928/21069
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the cognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women’s sexual victimization risk judgments and factors that may influence those processes. Participants were 423 undergraduate women between the ages of 18-24. The stimuli were 81 vignettes depicting dating and social situations varying in degree of sexual victimization risk and impact on the woman’s popularity. Participants read the vignettes and imagined either themselves (in the Self condition) or an anonymous undergraduate woman (in the Other condition) in the situations and classified each vignette as either high or low risk. Participants also completed measures of sexual victimization history, sociosexuality, rape myth acceptance, and perceived control. Results indicated that women in the Other condition, relative to the Self condition, classified more situations as high risk and were more sensitive to risk-relevant information when making explicit risk judgments. Additionally, women higher in sociosexuality, relative to women lower in sociosexuality, rated fewer situations as high risk and were less sensitive to both risk and popularity impact information when making explicit risk judgments. Finally, women higher in rape myth acceptance were more sensitive to popularity impact information when making explicit risk judgments. This is the first study to examine the role of sensitivity and bias in the optimistic bias in women’s judgments of victimization risk. These specific cognitive processes may be important in explaining and potentially reducing women’s optimistic bias and in developing more effective sexual assault prevention programs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectOptimistic Bias, Sexual Victimization, Risk Judgmentsen_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen college students--Sexual behavior.
dc.subject.lcshSexual harassment--Psychological aspects.
dc.subject.lcshRisk perception.
dc.subject.lcshCognitive psychology.
dc.subject.lcshOptimism.
dc.subject.lcshRape--Psychological aspects.
dc.titleCognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women's victimization risk judgementsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.description.degreePsychologyen_US
dc.description.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.description.departmentUniversity of New Mexico. Dept. of Psychologyen_US
dc.description.advisorYeater, Elizabeth
dc.description.committee-memberAngela Bryan, Tim Goldsmith
dc.description.committee-memberTeresa Treat, Richard Viken


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