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Cognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women's victimization risk judgements

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21069

Cognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women's victimization risk judgements

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dc.contributor.author Rinehart, Jenny Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-28T17:13:27Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-28T17:13:27Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-28
dc.date.submitted July 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21069
dc.description.abstract This study examined the cognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women’s sexual victimization risk judgments and factors that may influence those processes. Participants were 423 undergraduate women between the ages of 18-24. The stimuli were 81 vignettes depicting dating and social situations varying in degree of sexual victimization risk and impact on the woman’s popularity. Participants read the vignettes and imagined either themselves (in the Self condition) or an anonymous undergraduate woman (in the Other condition) in the situations and classified each vignette as either high or low risk. Participants also completed measures of sexual victimization history, sociosexuality, rape myth acceptance, and perceived control. Results indicated that women in the Other condition, relative to the Self condition, classified more situations as high risk and were more sensitive to risk-relevant information when making explicit risk judgments. Additionally, women higher in sociosexuality, relative to women lower in sociosexuality, rated fewer situations as high risk and were less sensitive to both risk and popularity impact information when making explicit risk judgments. Finally, women higher in rape myth acceptance were more sensitive to popularity impact information when making explicit risk judgments. This is the first study to examine the role of sensitivity and bias in the optimistic bias in women’s judgments of victimization risk. These specific cognitive processes may be important in explaining and potentially reducing women’s optimistic bias and in developing more effective sexual assault prevention programs. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Optimistic Bias, Sexual Victimization, Risk Judgments en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women college students--Sexual behavior.
dc.subject.lcsh Sexual harassment--Psychological aspects.
dc.subject.lcsh Risk perception.
dc.subject.lcsh Cognitive psychology.
dc.subject.lcsh Optimism.
dc.subject.lcsh Rape--Psychological aspects.
dc.title Cognitive processes underlying the optimistic bias in women's victimization risk judgements en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Psychology en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department University of New Mexico. Dept. of Psychology en_US
dc.description.advisor Yeater, Elizabeth
dc.description.committee-member Angela Bryan, Tim Goldsmith
dc.description.committee-member Teresa Treat, Richard Viken


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