LoboVault Home
 

EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY ON STUDENT LEARNING AND SELF-EFFICACY IN SCIENCE

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17482

EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY ON STUDENT LEARNING AND SELF-EFFICACY IN SCIENCE

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hushman, Carolyn
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-01T18:16:44Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-01T18:16:44Z
dc.date.issued 2012-02-01
dc.date.submitted December 2011
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17482
dc.description.abstract This study investigated whether the level of instructional guidance affected student learning and science self-efficacy when nine- and ten- year old children learn to design unconfounded experiments using control of variable strategies (CVS). Specifically, the goal of this study was to replicate and extend prior research that examines the impact of the level of guidance on ability to successfully design scientifically credible experiments that isolate the relationship between two variables (Klahr & Nigam, 2004). Sixty children, who were enrolled in a summer sports program, were randomly assigned in equal numbers to one of the three following conditions: 1) guided instruction, where children received instruction with examples and explanations; 2) direct instruction, where children received instruction through lecture with examples; and 3) discovery learning, where children received instruction through methods of self discovery. Before starting the experiment, participants completed a prior knowledge pretest and a science self-efficacy measure. After receiving a common introduction to scientists’ use of experiments, children received their assigned instructional treatment and completed the outcomes. The outcomes included: 1) design of experiments; 2) a recall measure about designing unconfounded experiments using CVS; 3) an application measure about applying CVS to scientific experiments; 4) an evaluation measure using CVS to evaluate a scientific experiment; and, 5) science self-efficacy. Results were analyzed using one-way ANOVAs and repeated-measures ANOVA. Children who received guided instruction designed a greater percentage of experiments correctly and had greater changes in self-efficacy relative to direct instruction and discovery learning. Children receiving direct instruction and guided instruction performed better than children who learned through discovery on all other learning measures. Results were interpreted in terms of theoretical and educational implications. en_US
dc.subject science education en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Science--Study and teaching (Elementary)--Research
dc.subject.lcsh Science--Experiments
dc.subject.lcsh Teaching--Research
dc.subject.lcsh Self-efficacy--Research
dc.title EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY ON STUDENT LEARNING AND SELF-EFFICACY IN SCIENCE en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree Educational Psychology en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department University of New Mexico. Division of Individual, Family and Community Education en_US
dc.description.advisor Marley, Scott C
dc.description.committee-member Atencio, David
dc.description.committee-member Flowerday, Terri
dc.description.committee-member Selig, James P.


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
DissertationFinal.pdf 2.069Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account