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dc.contributor.authorvan Reenen, Johannen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-11T04:01:49Z
dc.date.available2006-03-11T04:01:49Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationvan Reenen, Johann. "Virtual work and leadership: the role of the Internet, complexity, creativity, and knowledge workers." Invited chapter in: Ricardo Baeza-Yates, ed. THE ROLE OF HUMANITY IN THE INFORMATION AGE: An Ibero-American Perspective, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. [Online at: http://www.dcc.uchile.cl/~rbaeza/libro/ Chapter completed and accepted by Editor, 1/30/2002.]en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1928/168
dc.descriptionInvited chapter in: Ricardo Baeza-Yates, ed. THE ROLE OF HUMANITY IN THE INFORMATION AGE: An Ibero-American Perspective, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. [Online at: http://www.dcc.uchile.cl/~rbaeza/libro/ Chapter completed and accepted by Editor, 1/30/2002.]en_US
dc.description.abstractThis chapter presents the case for strong leadership to develop an internationally distributed virtual workforce. It is a speculative approach to how work and workers may behave in a future where most of their work and interactions will be virtual and disconnected from their physical location. The lessons that can be learned from the natural world are explored especially from complexity theories. Examples are provided of natural systems in action and the insights others have drawn from these theories and how this may inform decision-making, risk-taking and the management of virtual workers. The impact of the Internet on knowledge creation and discovery is explored. These theories and trends have important implications for leaders and managers and for stimulating creativity and innovation. One can speculate that in future digital workers will live in two realities; the @-Home-culture and the @-Large-culture. Knowledge workers of the future will be able to create a healthy balance between these two realities by working digitally in a global system and benefiting financially, but also living and participating fully in their local or national culture. Ultimately this may lead to more tolerance and opportunities to distribute work and wealth in ways that equalize rather than divide people.en_US
dc.format.extent285436 bytes
dc.format.extent1749 bytes
dc.format.extent81492 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
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dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectVirtual worken_US
dc.subjectInternational cooperationen_US
dc.subjectComplex adaptive systemsen_US
dc.subjectComplexityen_US
dc.subjectNatural systemsen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectKnowledge managementen_US
dc.subjectCreativityen_US
dc.subjectWorken_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectInformation ageen_US
dc.subjectGlobal economyen_US
dc.titleVirtual work and leadership: the role of the Internet, complexity, creativity, and knowledge workersen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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