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dc.contributor.authorVizenor, Gerald
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-07T20:35:28Z
dc.date.available2011-11-07T20:35:28Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.citationChicago Review, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, A North Pacific Rim Reader (1993), pp. 55-62en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-3696
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1928/15437
dc.descriptionSource: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25305717?&Search=yes&searchText=%22Gerald+Vizenor%22&list=hide&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3Dau%253A%2522Gerald%2BVizenor%2522%26gw%3Djtx%26acc%3Don%26prq%3Dau%253A%2522Irene%2BVasquez%2522%26Search%3DSearch%26hp%3D25%26wc%3Don&prevSearch=&item=1&ttl=86&returnArticleService=showFullTexten_US
dc.description.abstractThe Toya Maru might have been the end of me. The train ferry lost power and turned over in a typhoon between the islands of Honshu and Hokkaido. More than a thousand people died at sea that night. I was lucky. Our battalion had been ordered, at the last minute, to remain on the northern island and bivouac in the pristine Imperial National Forest. "The vessel carried soldiers of the United States First Cavalry Division transferring from Hokkaido to new posts on Honshu," reported The New York Times on 27 September 1954. "The typhoon did widespread damage over the main islands of Japan." The Toya Maru carried my typewriter and copies of my first stories to the bottom of Tsugaru Strait. I was wise to haiku that summer and would tote no more than a notebook. Naturally, that coincidence, and the loss of my typewriter, were trivial at the time.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.subjectHaikuen_US
dc.subjectChippewaen_US
dc.titleThe Envoy to Haikuen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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