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Disturbed Landscape/Disturbing Processes: Environmental History for the Twenty-First Century

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/15434

Disturbed Landscape/Disturbing Processes: Environmental History for the Twenty-First Century

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dc.contributor.author Norwood, Vera
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-07T19:37:21Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-07T19:37:21Z
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier.citation Pacific Historical Review, Vol. 70, No. 1 (February 2001), pp. 77-89 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0030-8684
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1928/15434
dc.description.abstract On the first weekend of May 2000, the opening act of the nation’s most impressive environmental drama of the summer was staged in Los Alamos, New Mexico. News releases covered a massive forest fire, named the Cerro Grande, exploding through forest stands, consuming over 40,000 acres of homes, recreation areas, and wildlands, burning perilously close to nuclear facilities, and threatening religious sites of Santa Clara pueblo. The fire, generated from a Park Service prescribed burn set in Bandolier National Monument and feeding on heavy fuel loads in the Santa Fe National Forest, raged out of control for days. Los Alamos and its neighboring bedroom community, White Rock, were evacuated. Local television news stations provided daily updates of the hundreds of homes lost. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of California Press en_US
dc.subject Environmental History en_US
dc.subject Landscape Processes en_US
dc.subject Forest fire en_US
dc.title Disturbed Landscape/Disturbing Processes: Environmental History for the Twenty-First Century en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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