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Making Modernity: Ideological Pluralism and Political Process in Zinacantán

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12875

Making Modernity: Ideological Pluralism and Political Process in Zinacantán

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Title: Making Modernity: Ideological Pluralism and Political Process in Zinacantán
Author: Adler, Kristen
Advisor(s): Dinwoodie, David
Committee Member(s): Nagengast, Carole
Oakdale, Suzanne
Haviland, John
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of Anthropology
Subject(s): Mexico
globalization
neoliberalism
pluralism
ethnicity
politics
LC Subject(s): Politics and culture--Mexico--Zinacantan
Politics and culture--Mexico--Chiapas
Neoliberalism--Mexico--Zinacantan
Neoliberalism--Mexico--Chiapas
Ideology--Political aspects--Mexico
Globalization--Mexico
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: This dissertation examines political process and ideology in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, focusing on the Tsotsil-speaking community of Zinacantán. The complex interplay between constructions of tradition and modernity clearly indicates that Zinacantán is not the isolated, "closed corporate community" often portrayed in the anthropological literature. Rather, complexities that emerge from local narratives suggest profound ideological pluralism, e.g., liberal individualism alongside hierarchical complementarity. Through a focus on narrative and event, this work challenges received notions of tradition and modernity and demonstrates the diverse ways in which Zinacantecos are traditionalizing the modern and modernizing the traditional through reflexive communicative means. Although this research focuses on Zinacantán, it also takes into consideration the influences of the Zapatista movement, the "indigenization" of the nearby ladino town of San Cristóbal and broad patterns of shifting political ideologies. As such, this work is in dialogue with and contributes new perspectives to current debates pertaining to neoliberalism and globalization, particularly by problematizing theories that view globalization as homogenizing.
Graduation Date: May 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12875

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