LoboVault Home
 

TEACHING FINANCIAL LITERACY IN K-12 SCHOOLS: A SURVEY OF TEACHER BELIEFS AND KNOWLEDGE

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10977

TEACHING FINANCIAL LITERACY IN K-12 SCHOOLS: A SURVEY OF TEACHER BELIEFS AND KNOWLEDGE

Show full item record

Title: TEACHING FINANCIAL LITERACY IN K-12 SCHOOLS: A SURVEY OF TEACHER BELIEFS AND KNOWLEDGE
Author: Otter, Dan
Advisor(s): Pence, Lueretia
Committee Member(s): Martin, Nathalie
Torrez, Cheryl
Zancanella, Don
Department: University of New Mexico. Division of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies
Subject(s): Financial Literacy
Survey
K-12 Teachers
Attitudes
Beliefs
Knowledge
LC Subject(s): Financial literacy--Study and teaching (Elementary)--United States
Financial literacy--Study and Teaching (Secondary)--United States
Finance, Personal--Study and teaching (Elementary)--United States
Finance, Personal--Study and teaching (Secondary)--United States
Teachers--Attitudes--Research
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to learn teacher attitudes and beliefs about teaching personal finance, as well as teacher understanding of a few core personal finance concepts. The population consisted of 1,120 classroom teachers from two public school districts in two states. The research questions were: (a) What are teacher attitudes and beliefs about personal finance instruction? (b) What are teacher understandings of a few core personal finance concepts? Data were gathered using a survey instrument. Questions were divided into four categories: (1) policy; (2) instruction; (3) professional development; and (4) concept knowledge. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze survey responses. The response rate was 16 percent, or 181 classroom teachers. Participants in this survey strongly support the teaching of personal finance topics in K-12 schools. Close to 83 percent agree or strongly agree with the statement, “It is important for schools to teach financial literacy.” Teachers at all grade levels in this study — elementary, middle, and high school — favor starting personal finance instruction in elementary school. Lack of suitable curriculum, lack of classroom materials, lack of instruction time, and lack of subject matter knowledge were identified as barriers to successful personal finance instruction. Respondents preferred format for professional development is a workshop that increases teacher financial literacy. The mean score for the 12 personal finance questions was 37.5 percent.
Graduation Date: May 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10977

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
otter_dan_dissertation.pdf 2.229Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account