LoboVault Home
 

Religion, Faith-Based Community Organizing, and the Struggle for Justice

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10686

Religion, Faith-Based Community Organizing, and the Struggle for Justice

Show full item record

Title: Religion, Faith-Based Community Organizing, and the Struggle for Justice
Author: Wood, Richard L.
Subject(s): religious communities
community organizing
Abstract: On May 2, 2000, three thousand people converged on the State Capitol in Sacramento, California. But this was not the usual frenzy of lobbyists serving the interests of the well-off, using the tools of well-oiled political action committees. Rather, these were working poor, working class, and lower-middle income people lately referred to as "working families" and they went to Sacramento because they were tired of living on the verge of financial ruin or physical debility. Attendees were demanding adequate health coverage for people left out by current health care arrangements and they were angry about that, at a time when remarkable wealth was being accumulated all around them and California was running a $10 billion budget surplus.
Date: 2003
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Citation: Richard Wood. "Religion, Faith-Based Community Organizing, and the Struggle for Justice." In Cambridge Handbook of the Sociology of Religion, Cambridge University Press, 2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10686

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
WoodCambridgePaper.pdf 64.87Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account