Now showing items 2895-2914 of 26412

  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0034. 

    Herbert Knup
    An industrial zone in northern Sao Paulo. Large percentages of such sectors of the economy as the petroleum and mining industries, railroads, or public utilities have been controlled by the state. Efforts in the early 1990s ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0035. 

    Herbert Knup
    The Arno electrical appliance plant in Sao Paulo. Brazil produces over 90% of its need for industrial goods. Brazilians can buy practically all the standard consumers goods found in developed nations.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0036. 

    Herbert Knup
    Cars on the Anhangabaú Valley area in downtown Sao Paulo. Brazil has the largest auto industry in the developing world, dominated mostly by multinationals. Today Brazilian cars are exported worldwide, and compete in such ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0037. 

    Herbert Knup
    A welder at an auto parts plant in Sao Paulo. During the 1950s and 1960s, Brazil undertook a large scale import substitution economic program, as it tried to replace imports with domestic production. Large amounts of foreign ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0038. 

    Herbert Knup
    Banks on Avenida Paulista in downtown Sao Paulo, considered the principal financial district of the city. The black curved building is the state industrial federation (FIESP), the most influential business association in ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0039. 

    Herbert Knup
    An ATM machine in downtown Sao Paulo. The majority of the Brazilian banks have been computerized and linked nationwide to allow instant withdrawal and deposit of funds.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0040. 

    Herbert Knup
    Foreign bank affiliates, such as the Banco Frances e Brasileiro, which is linked to major French banks, exist in large numbers. Nevertheless, foreign lending, due to Brazil's large foreign debt has greatly been curtailed. ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0041. 

    Herbert Knup
    A Shell gas station in downtown Sao Paulo. As already mentioned earlier, foreign multinationals settled in Brazil in large numbers since the 1950s, especially in the 1960s and 1970s. The recent recession has curtailed ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0042. 

    Herbert Knup
    A MacDonald restaurant in downtown Sao Paulo. Multinationals are responsible for nearly one fourth of the nation's industrial production and nearly thirty percent of its manufactured exports. The largest investors include ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0043. 

    Herbert Knup
    Loading charcoal onto two Mercedes Benz trucks in the northern industrial district of Sao Paulo. Most goods are still transported by trucks in Brazil, which has an extensive highway network.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0044. 

    Herbert Knup
    Ship awaiting to be loaded in the harbor of Salvador (Bahia), in northeastern Brazil. Modem ports such as Santos (near Sao Paulo), Rio de Janeiro, or Salvador serve as gateways for the majority of Brazil's exports.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0045. 

    Herbert Knup
    Construction workers in Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais). Brazil's labor force has become quite specialized in recent years, though the overall level of education still remains a challenge to put it on a par with the Asian economies.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0046. 

    Herbert Knup
    View of Botafogo Bay; in the background is downtown Rio de Janeiro. While Sao Paulo is the economic powerhouse, Rio de Janeiro is considered the "fun-loving" capital of the country. Nevertheless, Rio remains the nation's ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0047. 

    Herbert Knup
    View of downtown Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. With over 3 million people, Belo Horizonte and several nearby cities produce much of the nation's iron ore and steel products.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0048. 

    Herbert Knup
    Steel mill in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. The growth of the state of Minas Gerais has been such that it will become the second most important industrial state in the nation, displacing the state of Rio de Janeiro.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0049. 

    Herbert Knup
    Food processing plant in Salvador, Bahia. Brazil now has over 10 cities with over one million people and regional economic differences are slowly changing as firms are being convinced to set operations in new areas.
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0050. 

    Herbert Knup
    The Itaipu hydroelectric plant, in western Paraná. A joint venture with Paraguay, it is the largest in the world and its dam has created a 170 km long lake. Despite numerous dam projects, many regions in the North and ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0051. 

    Herbert Knup
    Alcohol gas pump near Porte Alegre (RS). As an alternative energy source, the Brazilian government has invested in a large scale program, by which cars run on alcohol produced from sugarcane. A large percentage of Brazilian ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0052. 

    Herbert Knup
    The Santa Teresa favela (slum) in Rio de Janeiro. Cities like Belo Horizonte, Rio and São Paulo, while developing into exciting Twentieth century metropolis, have serious, virtually unsolvable social and political ...
  • [2009-03-02] Brazil Slide Series: Collection Sao Paulo, Slide No. 0053. 

    Herbert Knup
    View of a favela in the São Paulo Morumbi district. Pathological population growth, outstripping all efforts to provide urban infrastructure, huge numbers of abandoned street children, sprawling favelas, saturation of ...