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Teaching a school-based AAC team to support the communication skills of a student who requires AAC

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9966

Teaching a school-based AAC team to support the communication skills of a student who requires AAC

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Title: Teaching a school-based AAC team to support the communication skills of a student who requires AAC
Author: Thatcher, Amy
Advisor(s): Binger, Cathy
Committee Member(s): Nettleton, Sandy
Rodriguez, Barbara
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Subject(s): Communication partner instruction
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)
Aided AAC modeling
Group instruction
Cueing hierarchy
LC Subject(s): Language arts--Remedial teaching--Evaluation
Communicative disorders in children--Treatment--Evaluation
Degree Level: Masters
Abstract: Many children of all ages are in need of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Adult communication partners in the school setting typically interact differently with children who use AAC than they do with others. In prior studies, an eight-step instructional program designed to teach adult communication partners to facilitate the communication skills of students who use AAC has been used within an individual instructional format. The eight-step instructional model used to teach these adults has been shown to be effective; however, research is required to establish the efficacy of this program when providing instruction to adult communication partners within group settings. In the current study, the eight-step model was used to instruct one school-based AAC team within group settings. Results indicated that group instruction was an effective and efficient way to teach the AAC team a cueing hierarchy to facilitate the child’s communication skills; every adult increased his or her accurate use of the strategy, and results were statistically significant. However, generally speaking, the adults did demonstrate more errors than adults in prior studies who received instruction in one-on-one settings, indicating that more work needs to be done to ensure the effectiveness of providing instruction within group settings.
Graduation Date: July 2009
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/9966

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