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dc.contributor.authorBlack, Chad T.
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-20T19:50:52Z
dc.date.available2009-02-20T19:50:52Z
dc.date.issued1999-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1928/7722
dc.description.abstractThe 1990 Indian Uprising staged by the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE) forced indigenous issues into the national political discourse of Ecuador through the activities of a post-Marxist, progressive social movement. The formation of CONAIE, in 1986, and the 1990 Uprising were the culmination of an organizational process that began in the 1970s with indigenous regional organizing as a reaction against Marxist/mestizo/ integrationist leadership, repression of traditional leftist organizations, and increasing pressures placed on indigenous communities through Ecuador's heightened position in the capitalist world-economy. This organizational process clarified to indigenous leaders a new vision of progressive social praxis based upon ethnic and cultural claims, rather than the strictly economic demands of the traditional left. This paper documents the organizing process as a significant historical development in the emergence of post-Marxist progressive social movements.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLatin American and Iberian Instituteen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLatin American and Iberian Instituteen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLAII Research Paper Seriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo. 32en_US
dc.subjectindigenous movement, culture, Ethnicity, post-Marxist, Ecuadoren_US
dc.titleThe Making of an Indigenous Movement: Culture Ethnicity, and Post-Marxist Social Praxis in Ecuadoren_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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