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STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526

STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL

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dc.contributor.author Hernandez, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-16T15:45:47Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-16T15:45:47Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-16
dc.date.submitted July 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526
dc.description.abstract This descriptive study assessed stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services in a convenience sample (N = 211) of Air Force nursing personnel, including 111 officers, 98 enlisted, and 2 of unknown grade, to answer the following research questions: (1) What are the perceived levels of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services for Air Force nursing personnel? and (2) Does military grade affect perceived levels of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services for officer and enlisted Air Force nursing personnel? The hypotheses were that there would be no difference between officer and enlisted Air Force nursing personnel in perceived levels of both stigma and barriers to care associated with accessing mental health services. Participants completed a survey that included the Britt (2000) and Hoge et al. (2004) stigma scale and the Hoge et al. (2004) barriers to care scale. The stigma scale’s grand mean was 3.1 (α = .89; SD = 0.97), an average response of neither agree nor disagree. More than 50% of respondents agreed that Members of my unit might have less confidence in me and My unit leadership might treat me differently. The barriers to care scale’s grand mean was 2.1, an average response of disagree. Scheduling an appointment was a barrier for approximately 20% of respondents. Approximately 40% of respondents agreed that difficulty getting time off from work for treatment was a barrier to care. Significant differences between officer and enlisted responses to stigma and barriers to care items were found; however, the effect sizes were small. Compared with enlisted personnel, officers were more likely to agree that accessing mental health services would be embarrassing, harm their career, or cause leaders to blame them for the problem (p ≤.03 for each comparison). The sample’s proportion indicating agreement to the stigma scale items were within ranges previously reported by service members screening positive for a mental health disorder after a deployment. Because perceptions of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services endure, military leadership must stress the benefits of early access to mental health services and pursue an aggressive anti-stigma campaign. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Stigma en_US
dc.subject Air Force en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Nurse en_US
dc.subject Barriers to Care en_US
dc.subject Military en_US
dc.title STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.description.degree PhD en_US
dc.description.level Doctoral en_US
dc.description.department University of New Mexico. College of Nursing en_US
dc.description.advisor Parshall, Mark
dc.description.committee-member Bedrick, Edward
dc.description.committee-member Meize-Grochowski, Robin
dc.description.committee-member Mendelson, Cindy


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