LoboVault Home

Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles : targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20884

Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles : targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.

Show full item record

Title: Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles : targeted imaging and therapy of prostate cancer.
Author: Taylor, Robert
Advisor(s): Sillerud, Laurel
Committee Member(s): Anderson, William
Bisoffi, Marco
Thompson, Todd
Department: University of New Mexico. Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program
Subject: Nanotechnology
Cancer research
Prostate Cancer
Biomedical engineering
Nanoscience
MRI
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Therapy
Imaging
Drug Delivery
Superparamagnetic
iron oxide
SIPPs
SPIONs
LC Subject(s): Prostate--Cancer--Chemotherapy.
Prostate--Cancer--Magnetic resonance imaging.
Micelles.Nanoparticles--Magnetic properties.
Nanoparticles--Magnetic properties.
Ferric oxide--Magnetic properties.
Nanomedicine.
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: In the United States, prostate cancer is the second most common reason for cancer death in men. No imaging methods currently exist which are specific for detecting, imaging, and treating extracapsular or metastatic prostate cancer. The goal of this research was to develop novel nanoparticles that would specifically target human prostate cancer cells and simultaneously deliver a chemotherapeutic agent and superior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent to the prostate cancer cells for both therapy and MRI detection. This dissertation describes the synthesis and comprehensive characterization of superparamagnetic iron-platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and their subsequent encapsulation with the drug Paclitaxel, using a mixture of functionalized phospholipids, to create SIPP and Paclitaxel-loaded micelles (SPMs) conjugated to an antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer cells and tumors. Taken together the data suggest that SPMs specifically target human prostate cancer cells, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and prevent prostate tumor growth in a PSMA-dependent manner.
Graduation Date: May 2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20884


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
120409_Dissertation.pdfBlocked 13.22Mb PDF View/Open Dissertation

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Browse

My Account