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Capital Mediators: American Mining Engineers in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, 1850-1914

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20828

Capital Mediators: American Mining Engineers in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, 1850-1914

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Title: Capital Mediators: American Mining Engineers in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, 1850-1914
Author: Grossman, Sarah E. M.
Advisor(s): Truett, Samuel
Committee Member(s): Ball, Durwood
Hutchison, Elizabeth
Kline, Ronald
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of History
Subject(s): engineering
gender
mining
U.S.-Mexico border
expertise
work
LC Subject(s): Mining engineering -- Mexican-American Border Region -- History
Mining engineering -- West (U.S.) -- History
Mining engineers -- West (U.S.) -- History
Mining engineers -- Mexican-American Border Region -- History
Mineral industries -- Social aspects -- West (U.S.)
Mineral industries -- Social aspects -- Mexican-American Border Region
Expertise -- Economic aspects -- Mexican-American Border Region
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: This dissertation analyzes the technical work and social milieu of American mining engineers to understand the daily negotiations by which private U.S. capital reached up to and across the southwestern border as part of an ongoing project of American territorial and economic expansion. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American mining engineers traveled all over the world as expert consultants and labor managers. The business negotiations, elite social networks, and gendered discourse of “expertise” invoked by these technocratic professionals were critical influences in bringing the hard-rock mining districts of North America into the economic system of the United States. By integrating the history of technical experts into the history of the transnational mining industry, my research contributes to an understanding of the process by which American economic hegemony was established in a border region peripheral to the federal governments of both Washington, D.C. and Mexico City.
Graduation Date: May 2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20828
Item Available: 2014-05-14

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