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Will YOU have a false memory? : investigating individual differences in semantic false memories

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17506

Will YOU have a false memory? : investigating individual differences in semantic false memories

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Title: Will YOU have a false memory? : investigating individual differences in semantic false memories
Author: Stevens-Adams, Susan
Advisor(s): Butler, Karin
Committee Member(s): Goldsmith, Timothy
Ruthruff, Eric
Hutchison, Keith
Matzen, Laura
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of Psychology
Subject(s): false memories
individual differences
semantic networks
semantic relatedness ratings
LC Subject(s): False memory syndrome.
Semantic memory.
Word recognition.
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: Four experiments extended the false memory research by investigating false memory performance at the individual level (e.g., Stevens, unpublished Master’s Thesis, 2006). The experiments used the DRM paradigm which presents lists of associated studied words (e.g., hot, winter) and then tests whether nonpresented theme word(s) (e.g., cold) is (are) falsely remembered. Previous research (e.g., fuzzy-trace theory) has proposed that the semantic relationships between words on the DRM lists are influential in false memory performance. In the experiments, each participant rated the semantic relatedness of word pairs drawn from associated sets. The first experiment investigated whether participants’ semantic ratings would predict their false memory performance. For the other three experiments, the ratings were later used in the study-test procedure, such that the theme words on the recognition test were preceded by words either deemed strongly related or weakly related to the theme word. The final experiment also explored whether creating study lists from semantic ratings influenced false memory. The results, expected to support the fuzzy-trace theory of false memory, provided more support for the activation/monitoring theory.
Graduation Date: December 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17506

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