LoboVault Home

"You have to care" Perceptions of supporting autonomy in support settings for adults with intellectual disability.

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17496

"You have to care" Perceptions of supporting autonomy in support settings for adults with intellectual disability.

Show full item record

Title: "You have to care" Perceptions of supporting autonomy in support settings for adults with intellectual disability.
Author: Petner-Arrey, Jami
Advisor(s): Copeland, Susan
Committee Member(s): Avila, Magdalena
Armstrong, Jan
Luckasson, Ruth
Scherba de Valenzuela, Julia
Department: University of New Mexico. Division of Educational Specialties
Subject: intellectual disability, mental retardation, special education, autonomy, self-determination, choice, choice-making, decision-making, control, direct support staff, direct support professional, caregiver, support provider, institutional control, institutional goal prioritzation, challenging behavior, choice construction, qualitative, DSPs, interview
LC Subject(s): People with mental disabilities--Attitudes
People with mental disabilities--Psychology
People with mental disabilities--Services for--Evaluation
People with mental disabilities--Social conditions
Autonomy (Psychology)
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: This study investigated the perceptions of persons with intellectual disability (ID) receiving support and the persons providing support regarding the autonomy of people with ID and how they perceive that it is either supported or denied within daily interactions between direct support professionals (DSPs) and people with disabilities. The participants included 10 people with ID receiving various support services and 10 DSPs. This qualitative investigation used interviews to examine issues related to the support role, the support relationship, the decision-making process of DSPs and the lives of people with ID. Analysis of participant interviews revealed that although participants with ID were capable of demonstrating their autonomy, DSPs faced several challenges that contributed to their difficulty in supporting autonomy of people with ID. Both groups of participants noted that DSPs had to demonstrate care towards people with ID to effectively support their autonomy. Some additional findings were that challenging behavior of individuals with ID may be caused by the lack of choices provided; that DSPs' concentration on the safety, health, and protection of persons with ID often limited the expression the autonomy of persons with ID. I found that DSPs often exerted subtle, pervasive, obvious, or overt control over the individuals they supported and often prioritized institutional goals over the goals of individuals with ID. In summary, paid caregiving presents problems in supporting the autonomy of those receiving support, despite the often well-intentioned efforts of the DSPs.
Graduation Date: December 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17496


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
DISSERTATION.pdf 1.101Mb PDF View/Open Dissertation

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Browse

My Account