LoboVault Home

WHOSE “SHARED HUMANITY”?: THE TRIBAL LAW AND ORDER ACT (2010), BARACK OBAMA, AND THE POLITICS OF MULTICULTURALISM IN SETTLER COLONIAL STATES

LoboVault

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17442

WHOSE “SHARED HUMANITY”?: THE TRIBAL LAW AND ORDER ACT (2010), BARACK OBAMA, AND THE POLITICS OF MULTICULTURALISM IN SETTLER COLONIAL STATES

Show full item record

Title: WHOSE “SHARED HUMANITY”?: THE TRIBAL LAW AND ORDER ACT (2010), BARACK OBAMA, AND THE POLITICS OF MULTICULTURALISM IN SETTLER COLONIAL STATES
Author: Minno, Liza Drake
Advisor(s): Brandzel, Amy
Committee Member(s): Denetdale, Jennifer
Goldstein, Alyosha
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of American Studies
Subject: "Tribal Law and Order Act of 2009"
Neoliberal Multiculturalism
Settler Colonialism
LC Subject(s): Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc.
Indians of North America--Government relations
Criminal jurisdiction--United States
Criminal justice, Administration of--United States
Degree Level: Masters
Abstract: This thesis advances a critical understanding of the ways in which neoliberal multiculturalism works to naturalize settler colonialism in the United States through the queer, feminist, and decolonial use of visual, historical, and legal analysis. The Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) of 2010, as well as the White House signing ceremony for the TLOA serve as the main sites for this analysis. The central argument of the thesis is that multiculturalism in the United States facilitates the ongoing naturalization of settler prerogatives and that Barack Obama, through his deployment of affect and analogy, is especially effective at normalizing multicultural settler domination of colonized lands and peoples. Subtending this argument are arguments about how settler colonialism is maintained through the use of sexual violence against Indigenous people and through heteronormativity, which must be continuously-enforced. The thesis, therefore, interrogates the effects of the settler state’s gestures toward Indigenous women and sexual violence in the TLOA and the TLOA signing ceremony. The bulk of the evidence for the thesis comes from secondary historical sources, the genealogy of laws that constitutes Federal Indian Policy in the United States, and original legal analysis of the TLOA and the TLOA Congressional Hearings, as well as original visual and discourse analyses of the TLOA signing ceremony.
Graduation Date: December 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/17442


Files in this item

Files Size Format View
thesis for submission Liza Minno.pdf 355.2Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

UNM Libraries

Search LoboVault


Browse

My Account