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The unique properties of self-objectification and social and individual influences on its expression

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/13144

The unique properties of self-objectification and social and individual influences on its expression

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Title: The unique properties of self-objectification and social and individual influences on its expression
Author: Gianini, Loren
Advisor(s): Smith, Jane Ellen
Committee Member(s): Bryan, Angela
Erickson, Sarah
Yager, Joel
Department: University of New Mexico. Dept. of Psychology
Subject: body image
LC Subject(s): Body image in women.
Self-perception in women.
Body image disturbance.
Eating disorders.
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: Objectification Theory suggests that women are frequently viewed largely as sexualized objects, whether it occurs in interpersonal interactions or in media images. One major consequence of routine exposure to this pervasive objectification of women’s bodies by others is that girls and women internalize this outsider’s view of themselves and engage in self-objectification. One purpose of the two following studies was to differentiate self-objectification from other, similar constructs which included public selfconsciousness, self-monitoring, and social anxiety. A second purpose was to elucidate factors that predict heightened self-objectification, including teasing, the influence of family and peers, and the influence of the media. Two hundred and two undergraduate women completed questionnaire data as part of Study One, and 204 undergraduate women completed questionnaire data as part of Study Two. Results of Study One revealed that measures of self-objectification predicted body shame better than seemingly similar variables measuring public self-consciousness, social phobia, and self-monitoring in the context of multiple linear regressions. Path analyses conducted as part of Study Two revealed that media influence directly predicted self-objectification, which in turn predicted body image disturbance and disordered eating. Teasing and the influence of family and friends predicted self-objectification; however, self-objectification did not mediate the relationship between these variables and body image disturbance and disordered eating. Instead, teasing and the influence of family and friends directly predicted body image disturbance and disordered eating independently of their relationships with self-objectification. Results revealed that self-objectification is a distinct construct related to body image disturbance and eating pathology which is predicted by family, peer, and media influence, as well as teasing.
Graduation Date: July 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/13144


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