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dc.contributor.authorBoone, James L.
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Karen L.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-23T15:07:26Z
dc.date.available2011-08-23T15:07:26Z
dc.date.issued2002-06
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Anthropology, Vol. 43, No. 3 (June 2002), pp. 511-517en_US
dc.identifier.issn0011-3204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1928/13062
dc.description.abstractIt is widely held that human population growth rates began to increase markedly after the Pleistocene/Holocene transition largely as a consequence of the adoption of agriculture and sedentism. A common explanation for this increase in growth rates has been that circumstances associated with food production and/or the accompanying decrease in mobility allowed for higher fertility rates, but over the past decade a number of empirical studies and simulation analyses have revealed that the relationship between mode of subsistence and fertility is more complex than had previously been realized.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.subjectfertilityen_US
dc.subjectagricultureen_US
dc.subjectpopulation growthen_US
dc.subjectsedentismen_US
dc.titleWhy Intensive Agriculturalists Have Higher Fertility: A Household Energy Budget Approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US


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