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EXPLORING THE LANGUAGE OF OLDER ADULT LEARNERS AS THEY DISCUSS BEGINNING A BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAM

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12877

EXPLORING THE LANGUAGE OF OLDER ADULT LEARNERS AS THEY DISCUSS BEGINNING A BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAM

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Title: EXPLORING THE LANGUAGE OF OLDER ADULT LEARNERS AS THEY DISCUSS BEGINNING A BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAM
Author: Verstynen, Pamela
Advisor(s): Boverie, Patricia
Committee Member(s): Bramble, William
Noll, Bruce A.
Wilcox, Phyllis P.
Department: University of New Mexico. Division of Educational Leadership and Organizational Learning
Subject: baby-boomer students, older adult students, support systems, expectations, motivation, expectations, challenges, transformation, resilience, self-efficacy, desire, metaphors, cognitively structured metaphors, phenomenological study, qualitative analysis, data validity using cognitively structured metaphors
Non-traditional college students
LC Subject(s): Baby boom generation--Psychology
Adult college students--Attitudes
College freshmen--Attitudes
Degree Level: Doctoral
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore the metaphors and cognitively structured metaphors older adult students of the Baby Boomer generation use when discussing their experiences of beginning a bachelor’s program. Research regarding the cognitive abilities of older adult students was explored. A phenomenological approach was used employing open-ended questions during a single interview designed to elicit information about four areas of interest: support systems, motivation, expectations and a comparison of this experience to another life experience. The analysis of students’ responses identified figurative metaphors and metonymy. Qualitative analysis was applied to the data, followed by identifying cognitive metaphors and synecdoche. Themes and patterns to the responses to the four areas of interest were identified. Five major themes also emerged: challenges, transformation, self-efficacy, resilience and desire. The study demonstrates the power added to a qualitative study when including the analysis of cognitively structured metaphors. The findings have implication to colleges and universities that are committed to helping older adult students be successful.
Graduation Date: May 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12877


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PamVerstynen Final.pdf 1.427Mb PDF View/Open Complete dissertation
PamVerstynen Final.pdf 1.427Mb PDF View/Open Dissertation

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