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Race in Ordinary Course: Utilizing the Racial Background in Antitrust and Corporate Law Courses

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12671

Race in Ordinary Course: Utilizing the Racial Background in Antitrust and Corporate Law Courses

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dc.contributor.author Mathewson, Alfred
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-08T18:31:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-08T18:31:15Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation 23 St. John's J. Legal Comment. 667 (2008) en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1928/12671
dc.description.abstract This article is about the discourses in law school classes in which non-white students are in classes with white students. While I stake a position distinct from critical race theorists, I do not analyze critical race theory or the large body of scholarship pertaining thereto in this article. I limit my discussion to my use of race in teaching traditional law school subjects, specifically antitrust and corporate law. I present this article in two parts. In Part I, I describe the challenges of using critical race theory to introduce discussions of race in traditional law school subjects. Race is interjected as an outsider. In Part II, I present my race in ordinary course approach. I do not suggest that my approach is superior to Critical Race Theory; I offer it only as another avenue of discussing race. In my approach, the subject matter drives the analysis and race is visibly interwoven into conventional legal analysis. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher St. John's University School of Law en_US
dc.title Race in Ordinary Course: Utilizing the Racial Background in Antitrust and Corporate Law Courses en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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